Civil Rights Photo Galleries U.S.

“This is my city.” Photos from Baltimore’s protests

BALTIMORE, MD - APRIL 27:  A man faces down a line of Baltimore Police as a CVS burns near the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues during violent protests following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray, 25, who was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Homes housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A man faces down a line of Baltimore Police as a CVS burns near the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues during violent protests following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Written by P. Kim Bui

 Protests escalate into riots hours after Freddie Gray is laid to rest.

Thousands showed up for the funeral of Freddie Gray, the 25-year-old man who died after being arrested in Baltimore.

“We must not allow an already tragic situation to tear our community apart,” Sen. Barbara Mikulski said in a statement released around the same time as the funeral.

The funeral took place after a weekend of protests and arrests in Baltimore.

“After this day, we are going to keep on marching, said Rev. Jamal Bryant at the funeral. “After this day, we are going to keep on demanding justice. After this day, we are going to keep exposing our culture of corruption.”


Funeral home employees move Freddie Gray's casket into place inside the New Shiloh Baptist Church during his funeral April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Homes housing project on Baltimore's west side. According to his attorney, Gray died a week later in the hospital from a severe spinal cord injury he received while in police custody.

Freddie Gray’s mother Gloria Darden (2nd L) looks on as doves are released during Gray’s graveside service at Woodlawn Cemetery April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Gray, 25, was arrested for possessing a switch blade knife April 12 outside the Gilmor Homes housing project on Baltimore’s west side. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

 

The streets of Baltimore did not stay peaceful for long.

Protestors were still angry over the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered a severe spinal cord injury and died seven days after his arrest. His death isbeing investigated by the Justice Department.

BALTIMORE, MD - APRIL 27:  Protestors surround a Baltimore Police officer near Mondawmin Mall, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The funeral service for Freddie Gray, who died last week while in Baltimore Police custody, was held on Monday morning. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Protestors surround a Baltimore Police officer near Mondawmin Mall, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The funeral service for Freddie Gray, who died last week while in Baltimore Police custody, was held on Monday morning. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Videos and photos of protestors throwing bricks at police began to surface.

The group, according to Baltimore Police, at least partially consisted of teenagers.

Bricks and stones were thrown between the police and protestors. After some time, the police began to use tear gas against protestors to try and quell the crowds who had shut down the streets.

Top: A Baltimore Police officers in riot gear push protestors back along Reisterstown Road near Mondawmin Mall, April 27 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Bottom left: Young person hurls a rock at Baltimore Police officers outside the Mondawmin Mall following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Bottom right: A Baltimore Police officer throws a rock back at violent protesters outside the Mondawmin Mall following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photos by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Protestors also set fire to police cars and other official vehicles. Mace was used against protestors, as well.

At an early press conference with police Captain Eric Kowalczyk, called the group going after police “outrageous criminals.”

Left: A Baltimore Police car passes two cars on fire near the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Avenue , April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Riots have erupted in Baltimore following the funeral service for Freddie Gray, who died last week while in Baltimore Police custody. Right: A man pours lighter fluid on debris near the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Avenue, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photos by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
In a press conference, the mayor of Baltimore, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake called the protestors turning to violence “thugs.” She announced a curfew, from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. that would stay in place for a week.

“It is idiotic to think that by destroying your city that you’re gonna make life better for anybody.”

Baltimore residents lock arms and form a line opposing police during violent protests at the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Baltimore residents lock arms and form a line opposing police during violent protests at the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

 

Councilman Brandon M. Scott also spoke, saying that Baltimore cannot stand, and should not stand a repeat of riots in 1968.

“We are not going to stand by and let cowards ruin our city…This is my city, we can’t sit idly and let it burn.”

BALTIMORE, MD - APRIL 27:Protestors on Reisterstown Road near Mowdamin Mall, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. The funeral service for Freddie Gray, who died last week while in Baltimore Police custody, was held on Monday morning. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

With Baltimore Police officers in riot gear lining the street, a man stands at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Avenue. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A state of emergency was declared by Gov. Larry Hogan. He said he called in the National Guard as a last resort.

About 5,000 National Guard members will be added to the hundreds of Baltimore Police on the street. Additionally, 5,000 more law enforcement have been requested from the region.

Hogan said he believed all law enforcement would use restraint.

“The last thing we want to do is escalate the violence,” Hogan said.

 On the streets, looting also took place. CVS closed several stores in the area after one of their stores was looted and set on fire. Rioters cut the line of the fire hose being used on one of the businesses on fire on national television, as captured by Buzzfeed News.

Left: People carry goods out of a CVS pharmacy near the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Avenue, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. Right: A man stands outside a damaged Cash Express store near the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and North Avenue (Photos by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) Bottom: Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts chases away protestors in a parking lot on Reisterstown Road near Mowdamin Mall, April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Bernard Jack Young, Baltimore’s City Council president said the violence was not what Freddie Gray’s family wanted.

Carron Morgan, Gray’s cousin, spoke to the Baltimore Sun’s Kevin Rector.

“We didn’t even want people to protest today. It was just a time to grieve for Freddie and to celebrate his life.”

A man shouts calm as protesters face off with Baltimore Police as a CVS pharmacy burns at the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues during violent protests following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A man shouts calm as protesters face off with Baltimore Police as a CVS pharmacy burns at the corner of Pennsylvania and North avenues during violent protests following the funeral of Freddie Gray April 27, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

About the author

P. Kim Bui

P. Kim Bui is the deputy managing editor for reported.ly. She’s also an adjunct instructor at the University of Southern California and co-founder of #wjchat, a weekly Twitter chat for web journalists.

Her experience in Web journalism includes news organizations such as Digital First Media’s Thunderdome, public media outlet KPCC, the Kansas City Star, APM’s Marketplace and the San Luis Obispo Tribune. She is on the board of directors of the Online News Association, and co-organizes the group’s L.A. contingent. She also is the program chair of V3, a digital media conference in Los Angeles, put on by the Asian American Journalists Association.

Share This